Category Archives: compliance

Greyline Solutions Continues Expansion

Regulatory Compliance Consulting Company Adds Significant Broker-Dealer Practice

Below is a press release from Greyline Solutions, one of the premier regulatory consulting groups (editors note: I have an ownership interest in this company and have worked with the acquired company, Vista Compliance, and Talia Brandt for a number of years).  I’d like to send my congratulations to all on the Greyline team!

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Greyline Solutions Expands with Addition of Vista Compliance

Greyline Solutions announces partnership with Vista Compliance. Talia Brandt to lead broker-dealer practice for Greyline.

San Francisco, Calif. – April 13, 2017 – Greyline Solutions, LLC, a premier financial regulatory and
compliance consulting firm headquartered in San Francisco, is partnering with Vista Compliance, a national compliance consulting firm based in San Francisco. The transaction, which is expected to close on May 1, 2017, will expand Greyline’s presence to the East Coast. It will also create a broker-dealer practice, which will be led by Talia Brandt, Vista’s founder.

Brandt and her team of senior consultants – who each have more than 10 years of industry experience, including experience at regulators – will reinforce Greyline’s ability to support alternative asset managers and traditional investment advisers in their compliance efforts.

“For the past nine years, Vista has been steadily growing our business by servicing investment advisers and broker dealers with a client-centric orientation and a commitment to partner with our clients to meet their compliance needs. In joining forces with Greyline, we are excited to leverage our offering by expanding our presence in other markets,” says Brandt.

“Vista’s success is impressive. Its depth of SEC and FINRA compliance experience, including experience working at regulators, has made it a top choice for managers looking for high-touch, institutional-quality services,” says Matthew Okolita, chief executive officer of Greyline. “Vista’s commitment to sustainable quality services aligns perfectly with our mission, and this partnership will allow us continue our efforts to expand nationally across all spectrums of the asset management industry.”

About Greyline Solutions

Headquartered in San Francisco, Greyline Solutions is a national compliance consulting firm offering comprehensive compliance solutions for businesses in the securities industry. Greyline prides itself on tailoring compliance management solutions to the unique needs its clients, which include private equity, venture capital, hedge fund managers, commodity pool operators and other investment managers, as well as businesses ranging from entrepreneurial start-ups to multi-billion dollar international institutions. Custom technology and experienced staff are two of the hallmarks of Greyline’s offerings. The firm is comprised of securities industry
professionals with decades of experience in the financial and regulatory industries. Its mission is to simplify the process, minimize risk, and lower costs, with the core goal of helping clients focus on building and enhancing their businesses.

Contact Information
Matthew Okolita
Greyline Solutions LLC
http://www.greylinesolutions.com
415.604.9527

SEC Compliance – Custody Issue

Annual Update Guidance on Custody Issue

It is that time of year that registered investment advisers are focusing on the ADV annual updating process.  Occasionally the SEC will provide guidance to managers on common questions applicable to the application or updating process.  Below is a note the SEC sent out to all registered investment advisers regarding the custody issue.  If you have questions on the application of the custody rules to your particular situation, you should discuss with your law firm or compliance consultant.

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To: SEC-Registered Investment Advisers,

This email is a reminder that all SEC-registered advisers that have custody of client assets should answer all questions in Item 9 of Part 1A of Form ADV. Each adviser’s answers will vary depending on facts and circumstances.

For example, advisers that have custody solely because they deduct fees from client accounts would respond “no” in Item 9.A. Additionally, these advisers would likely respond “no” in Items 9.B., and 9.D., and they likely would not need to provide information in Items 9.C. or 9.E. However, in Item 9.F., these advisers likely would need to indicate that there is at least one person acting as qualified custodian for their clients in connection with advisory services they provide to clients.

If you have questions, you may reply to this email.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Division of Investment Management
100 F Street, N.E.
Washington, DC 20549-8549
Phone | 202.551.6999

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon is a boutique law firm which provides regulatory compliance and consulting services to the investment management industry.  Bart Mallon can be reached directly at 415-868-5345.

Regulation S-ID Identity Theft Rules

Identity Theft Red Flag Rules Effective November 20, 2013

Pursuant to new SEC and CFTC rules, many registered managers, including private fund managers are now required to have identity theft programs in place.  Such managers will need to have robust policies in place in order to be compliant with the new rules.  Such policies will include: staff training for appearance of red flags, procedures for dealing with red flags, certification of procedures from administrators and/or custodians dealing with investor/customer accounts.

Below we have reprinted an article from the Compliance Focus blog maintained by Sansome Strategies LLC, a regulatory and compliance consulting company described in greater depth below.  The article reprinted below can be found here.

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Identity Theft Issues for Investment Advisers and Futures Participants
Jennifer Dickinson, Sansome Strategies

A little-known provision of the Dodd-Frank Act shifted responsibility over existing identity theft rules from the Federal Trade Commission to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”). The rules became effective May 20, 2013 and certain entities regulated by the SEC and CFTC will need to comply by November 20, 2013.

Overview

SEC and CFTC registrants that are “financial institutions” or “creditors” and that offer or maintain “covered accounts” for their clients will need to comply with the identity theft rules:

  • Financial institution: a bank, credit union or other person who holds a transaction account belonging to a consumer (a transaction account is one that permits withdrawals, payment orders, transfers or similar means for making payments to third parties);
  • Creditor: any person that regularly extends, renews or continues credit to others.
  • Covered account: any account that a financial institution or creditor offers or maintains:
    1. Primarily for personal, family or household purposes that involves or is designed to permit multiple payments or transactions; and
    2. There is a reasonably foreseeable risk to customers or to the safety and soundness of the financial institution or creditor from identity theft, including financial, operational, compliance, reputation or litigation risks. Examples include: for the SEC, brokerage or mutual fund accounts that permit wire transfers or other payments to third parties; for the CFTC, margin accounts.

Who will be affected, and how?

On the SEC side, broker-dealers, investment companies and investment advisers are considered financial institutions. On the CFTC side, commodity pool operators and commodity trading advisers will be considered creditors if they:

  • Regularly extend, renew or continue credit or arrange for the extension, renewal or continuation of credit; or
  • Acting as an assignee of an original creditor, participate in the decision to extend, renew or continue credit.

Firms that meet these definitions are required to implement reasonable policies and procedures that:

  • Identify “red flags” to prevent identity theft in the covered accounts they manage, and document them in the compliance program. Red flags can exist in the types of accounts the firm manages, the manner in which accounts are opened or accessed, and the firm’s previous experiences (if any) with identity theft;
  • Provide for monitoring accounts on an ongoing basis to detect red flags;
  • Respond appropriately to red flags;
  • Is periodically updated to reflect any changes in risks; and
  • Describe the various appropriate responses to red flags.

Whether a firm will meet the definitions will depend significantly on its client base and account structures. Traditional RIAs and other firms that manage accounts for individuals or family offices should look closely at those accounts to determine the types of activities that will be processed in them. A firm that handles bills or other third-party payments on behalf of its clients will need to undertake the most review and implement the most rigorous compliance program contemplated by the rules.

At first blush, fund managers may assume that these rules will not apply to them; however, care should be taken to ensure that investors’ accounts are set up to receive and hold investment amounts, and the only transfers permitted will be for management fees, performance allocations to the manager/general partner as applicable, and withdrawals by (and most importantly, back to) the investor to minimize identity theft risks. Even so, additional procedures around investor intake and withdrawal may need to be implemented.

CPOs and CTAs may undertake a similar evaluation and should also look at their investment strategies to determine the extent to which they meet the creditor definition.

Finally, even if a firm is not registered with the SEC or CFTC, identity theft can be a significant reputational and litigation risk for if they handle third-party payments on behalf of clients or investors. Accordingly state registrants and exempt firms should consider implementation as a best practice.

Compliance Strategies

The rules identify five specific categories that every compliance program should address:

  • Alerts, notifications or other warnings received from consumer reporting agencies or other service providers;
  • Presentation of suspicious documents;
  • Presentation of suspicious personal information (e.g., an unexpected or unusual address change);
  • Unusual usage of a particular account; and
  • Notices from customers, victims of identity theft, law enforcement agencies or others regarding possible identity theft in an account.

Employees should be trained to identify the above and any other red flags that are specific to the firm’s business.

Appropriate responses to a red flag incident will vary significantly depending on the circumstances. The rules mention:

  • Monitoring an account for evidence of identity theft;
  • Contacting the customer;
  • Changing passwords, security codes or other devices that permit access to an account;
  • Reopening accounts with new numbers;
  • Refusing to open an account;
  • Closing an existing account;
  • Refraining from collection activities on an account;
  • Notifying law enforcement; and

Determining that a response is warranted in a particular instance.

Other, proactive safeguards can include standardizing the forms and processes used to effect transactions in client accounts, designating a person or team of people to handle those transactions under supervision (and training them to detect identity theft), preparing and reviewing a daily transaction blotter, requiring additional approvals and documentations for higher risk transactions and implementing PINs or security questions and client call-backs, to name a few.

To the extent that safeguards are client or investor-facing (such as call-backs, PINs or other identity verification tools), these should be standardized and clients/investors notified of the procedures so they know what to expect. Obtaining client’s acknowledgment of these processes via the investment advisory or subscription agreement is a good way to handle this clearly and consistently.

To ensure compliance by November 20, 2013, we encourage all firms to reach out to their compliance consultant or legal counsel as soon as possible. Rolling out the program early will afford plenty of time to refine it by the deadline.

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About Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP

Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP provides legal services to the investment management community.  Please reach out to us through our contact form or call Bart Mallon directly at 415-868-5345 if you have questions on implementation. 

About Sansome Strategies LLC

Sansome Strategies is a compliance consulting firm specializing in high-touch, outsourced compliance services for businesses in the investment management industry. Clients include investment advisers, futures managers, broker-dealers, hedge funds, and private equity firms. Sansome Strategies provides tailored compliance management solutions to the unique needs of each client and is focused on helping clients build and enhance their business by simplifying the compliance and regulatory process.  Sansome Strategies is wholly owned by Karl Cole-Frieman and Bart Mallon.  For more information, please contact Sansome Strategies here.

FATCA Hedge Fund Compliance Event

June 19, 2013 – Sponsored by SS&C GlobeOp

We have previously discussed the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”) and the legal and compliance implications for hedge fund managers.  As the date draws near for implementation, various service providers to the investment management community will be providing more information to managers on how to prepare.  Below is information on an event happening soon in Chicago.

Please contact us if you would like information on how to register and we hope to see you there.

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Are you ready for FATCA? 

Join us at theWit Chicago for an engaging panel discussion on FATCA compliance requirements, followed by cocktails and networking.

Agenda:

  • 4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Registration 
  • 5:00 pm – 5:50 pm Panel Discussion
  • 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm Cocktail Reception

Moderator:

  • Nate Goodman, Director, Business Development, SS&C GlobeOp

Panelists:

  • Kevin J. K. Glen, Partner, Ernst & Young
  • Patti Griffin, Associate Director, International Tax Services, SS&C GlobeOp
  • Lindsey Simon, Founder, Simon Compliance

Topics will include:

  • Reporting realities
  • How to monitor progress
  • How to leverage technology
  • What resources are needed to gather data and complete the forms
  • What pitfalls you may encounter
  • How to determine if you are ready

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP is a boutique hedge fund law firm.  Bart Mallon can be reached directly at 415-868-5345.

Mock Exam Tips from ComplianceFocus.com

Occasionally we will have the opportunity to post articles which originally appeared on other websites and today we are republishing an article from compliancefocus.com on the topic of mock examinations.

The following article can be found at the ComplianceFocus blog here.

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7 Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Mock Examination

A mock exam can be a useful tool in many contexts, for example taking the place of your annual review, or helping growing managers transition from exempt reporting advisers or state registrants to SEC registration. Most importantly, it is an invaluable exercise in preparing existing SEC registrants for the inevitable real thing. The following tips will help you make the most of the mock exam experience:

1. Retain a consultant to perform the exam. Ideally this will be a consultant who is not already familiar with your business – either another team member from your current consulting firm or an entirely new firm. A mock exam conducted by internal compliance personnel is likely to be less formal and, however inadvertently, less objective.

2. Think locally. Look first to consultants in your area, who will be able to perform onsite interviews and other tasks with a minimum of expense. If you do retain a consultant that must travel, be prepared to pay for airfare, lodging and related expenses. Depending on your budget, this could be a limiting factor both in your choice of consulting firms and in the scope and realism of the exam. Consultants are often willing to conduct interviews by telephone, but this may diminish the “real thing” experience.

3. Go through your counsel. Your counsel may have referrals to compliance consultants and will likely have valuable feedback on the report that is ultimately created based on the exam. It is also worth noting that your counsel can retain the consultant on your behalf, which makes the exam and its results confidential under the attorney-client privilege.

4. Treat it like the real thing. Particularly if the examiner is familiar with your business or has access to your information (e.g., another consultant at the firm you currently use), you should treat the mock exam like it is the real thing, including the following:

a. Do not expect the examiner to use or rely on information already in the consulting firm’s files. Instead, produce all documents and information relevant to the request. Do not assume that the examiner has any background or other information on the questions s/he asks.

b. Even if your examiner has not specified a deadline, set internal deadlines, such as the final deadline to produce all requested documents and any interim deadlines for information or documents to be gathered by particular employees or departments.

c. Make your written responses to the document/information request as professional as possible, as if you were responding to a regulator.

d. If a particular request is not applicable, mark it as such in your response to the document request. Do not assume that the examiner knows it is inapplicable.

5. Ask for a risk-based exam. If you are registered with the SEC and using your mock exam to prepare for the real thing, ask prospective consultants if they can conduct as a risk-based “presence exam” per the SEC’s new protocol. While the initial interview and document request may not differ significantly from the traditional format, the examiner will ultimately identify a few higher risk areas for your firm and focus the bulk of the exam on those areas, including additional interviews and document/information requests.

6. Think about what keeps you up at night. Is there anything that would help your compliance team do better, be more efficient or fill in gaps in your compliance program? Consider asking the examiner for recommendations in these areas and include them in your report (see also Tip no. 3 above if you’re concerned about keeping these confidential). A recommendation from a reliable and objective third party may help you obtain additional resources internally to beef up your compliance program, e.g., to improve archiving and search capabilities for email surveillance, additional personnel or an online solution for trade review and the like.

7. Toot your own horn. Most positions or departments, regardless of the business or industry, face a moment when they have to justify their existence to management. Positives in your mock exam report are evidence of what your compliance team is doing well and should be highlighted in periodic meetings, your own internal compliance reviews and anywhere else they can be useful to you and your firm.

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP run the Hedge Fund Law Blog in addition to their hedge fund law firm. Bart Mallon can be reached directly at 415-868-5345.

ComplianceFocus.com is a project by Sansome Strategies LLC, a high-touch outsourced compliance company.  Sansome Strategies is owned by the principals of Cole-Frieman and Mallon LLP.

NFA Member Annual Update Reminder

Annual Update Information for CPOs, CTAs, IBs, and FCMs

We are a little behind getting this update out this year. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like help with any updates.

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NFA members (including commodity pool operators, commodity trading advisers, introducing brokers, futures commission merchants, and retail foreign exchange dealers) are reminded that every year, in order to maintain their registration and/or NFA membership, they must do the following by the anniversary date of their registration:

  1. complete the electronic Annual Registration Update;
  2. pay the annual registration records maintenance fee of $100 for each category of registration;
  3. complete the electronic Annual Questionnaire, which includes firm and disaster recovery information as well as a questionnaire for each category of registration; and
  4. pay annual membership dues. Information about dues is available here.

The NFA will send an email to the member, along with a letter detailing the annual filing requirements along with an invoice for fees due. If all of the annual filing requirements are not completed within 30 days following the annual due date, the NFA will treat it as a request to withdraw from registration and/or NFA membership. That status will be reflected on the NFA’s Online Registration System (ORS).

Annual Registration Update

To complete the Annual Registration Update, the firm should log into ORS and select the Update/Withdraw Registration Information tab. At the bottom of the screen, below the Annual Filings heading, the firm should click on the Annual Registration Update link to access the Annual Registration Update filing.

Annual Questionnaire

As indicated above, once a year, members must complete an Annual Questionnaire. The questionnaire provides the NFA with information about the firm and allows the NFA to better understand the composition of its membership as a whole. Additionally, the information provided allows the NFA to tailor its regulatory programs to better serve its members. Members are encouraged to update their questionnaire data on a regular basis, but must, at a minimum, complete the Annual Questionnaire on the anniversary of their NFA membership date.

To complete the Annual Questionnaire, the firm should log into ORS and select the Update/Withdraw Registration Information tab. At the bottom of the screen, below the Annual Filings heading, the firm should click on the Annual Questionnaire link to access the Annual Questionnaire.

Other Regulatory Reminders

Once a year, members should also be sure to complete the following items to remain in compliance with CFTC and NFA rules and regulations:

  • Send the firm’s privacy policy to every client, customer, or investor in a pool.
  • Test the firm’s disaster recovery plan and address any issues in the plan.
  • Provide ethics training as outlined in the firm’s compliance materials.
  • Supervise the operations of any branch offices, including conducting an annual onsite inspection.
  • Commodity pool operators and commodity trading advisors soliciting new investors or clients should update and file their disclosure documents with the NFA. A disclosure document used to solicit investors or clients cannot be more than 9 months old.

There are additional requirements specific to commodity pool operators, commodity trading advisers, introducing brokers, futures commission merchants, and retail foreign exchange dealers. More information about these requirements is available on the NFA website here.

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP provides managed futures legal services and other support to hedge fund managers. Bart can be reached directly at bmallon@colefrieman.com or 415-868-5345.

 

Karl Cole-Frieman Speaking at Fund Compliance Event

On December 1st and 2nd Private Equity International (PEI) will be hosting a Fund Compliance Forum in San Francisco.   The forum will be focused on providing private equity firms with information on various Dodd-Frank compliance requirements, including the investment adviser registration requirement.  Karl Cole-Frieman, a partner with Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP, will a panelist and will be discussing the compliance issues associated with marketing materials.  The overview of the session by Karl can be found here.

Information on the event is posted below and can be found on the PEI website by clicking here.

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PEI Private Fund Compliance Forum: San Francisco

An enormous collective sigh of relief was felt around the private equity world when the SEC announced that the deadline to register was moved to March 30, 2012. This extension has given private equity firms more time to designate a chief compliance officer, implement a compliance program, and file all necessary forms with the SEC.

The PEI Private Fund Compliance Forum: San Francisco provides private equity and venture capital firms an opportunity to gain a more complete understanding of what newly registered private funds should expect post-registration and how to implement and manage an effective compliance program.

This one and a half day event, divided into panel discussions and in-depth workshop sessions, is tailored to firms that are in the process of registering with the SEC, those firms that are seeking more information about the scope of what is entailed in registration as well as those who are already operating as RIAs that are looking to enhance their compliance functions.

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Panel: Effective and appropriate marketing materials

10:40 – 11:45

• Interpreting rules governing marketing and advertising

• Making sure that presentations are reviewed by compliance

• Making sure your web sites are in compliance

• Guidelines regarding talking to the press

Moderator:

Janis Kerns, Editor, ACA Insight

Panel Members:

Karl A. Cole-Frieman, Partner, Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP

Jennifer Keese-Powell, Marketing Manager, Hall Capital Partners LLC

Lois Towers, Compliance Officer, Pantheon Ventures (US)

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP provides a variety of services including: hedge fund formation, advisor registration and counterparty documentation, CFTC and NFA matters, seed deals, internal investigations, operational compliance, regulatory risk management, hedge fund due diligence, marketing and investor relations, employment and compensation matters, and routine business matters. For more information please visit us at: http://www.colefrieman.com/.

Form PF Filings to be Submitted via FINRA

SEC Mandates FINRA to Receive Form PF Filings

SEC has chosen FINRA to accept Form PF filings on its behalf when and if Form PF is adopted.  As background, on January 26, 2011 the SEC issued a proposed Rule 204(b)-1 under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 which would require SEC registered investment advisers to file a new Form PF with the SEC on either a quarterly or annual basis.  Although the rest of the proposed rule is still under consideration, the SEC has determined that if Form PF is adopted, investment advisers would file Form PF electronically through FINRA.  FINRA currently is the operator of IARD, the system through which investment advisers electronically file their Form ADV and make necessary notice filings to states.  If the rule is passed, FINRA will develop and maintain the filing system for Form PF as well.

The SEC initially anticipated that the proposed rule implementing Form PF would have an initial compliance date of December 15, 2011 – this appears less likely as we get closer to that date and plan to provide updates as appropriate.

Form PF Filing Process and Filing Fees

Because the filing system for Form PF will likely be an extension of the current IARD filing system, we expect the process will be substantially similar to the current process of filing Form ADV.  Investment advisers filing Form PF will likely have to go through the entitlement process and then fund their accounts with the fees necessary to submit the filing through the system.  Managers will have to make quarterly annual filing based on their assets under management. Regardless of assets under management, the filing fees shall be as the same for each filing:

  • $150 for each Form PF annual update
  • $150 for each Form PF quarterly update

Conclusion

FINRA is the logical choice to accept and manage the filing of Form PF because, as the current operator of the IARD system, they are uniquely situated to develop and deploy the Form PF filing system in a timely manner.  The SEC believes that having FINRA expand its existing platform to accommodate this additional filing would be result in greater efficiency for both the advisers and the SEC.  However, managers should be wary of the continued consolidation of filing platforms as FINRA continues to move towards becoming the SRO for hedge fund managers and other investment advisers.

The text of FINRA’s letter regarding Form PF can be found here: FINRA Form PF Letter

The text of SEC’s notice of intent to have Form PF filed through FINRA can be found here: SEC Form PF Announcement – IA-3297

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP provides comprehensive registration and compliance services to hedge fund managers, including help with filing Form PF.  Bart Mallon can be contacted directly at 415-868-5345.

States to Begin Proposing Rules on Expert Networks

Massachusetts Proposes Compliance Rules for Using Expert Networks

Expert networks have been a major topic over the last few months and we are seeing the states, in addition to the SEC, focus on this area as a compliance issue for investment advisers.  Massachusetts recently revoked the state investment adviser license of a manager who was using expert networks to gain inside information and then trade on that information.  Massachusetts is now proposing regulations which would require state registered managers to develop certain policies with respect to use of expert

networks.

The proposed regulation provides generally that investment advisers may not use expert network services unless the adviser receives a signed certification from the consultant (sourced by the expert network firm) that:

  • describes the confidential restrictions the consultant has regarding confidential information and
  • the consultant affirmatively states that he will not provide any confidential information to the adviser

In addition to this new compliance requirement, the proposal codifies the general prohibition against trading on inside information.

The full text of the proposed regulation is printed below and can be found here.  The Massachussets Securities Division will hold a public hearing on these and other proposed regulations on June 23 and will accept written comments until June 24.

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Preamble to Proposed Regulation

Investment Advisers Using Matching or Expert Network Services – Dishonest or Unethical Conduct in the Securities Business

The Division proposes to add a new section under 950 CMR 12.205(9)(c)(16) to the existing list of dishonest and unethical practices. The Division believes this addition is necessary to address the rising use of expert network firms by investment advisers to facilitate paid consultations between investment advisers and industry experts.

As alleged in In the Matter of Risk Reward Capital Management Corp., RRC Management LLC, RRC BioFund LP, and James Silverman, Docket No. E-2010-057, some investment advisers have paid expert networks and consultants to access confidential information about

publicly traded companies. The rise of expert network firms, and the number of abuses which have been addressed by regulators, make it clear that additional measures are required to ensure that confidential information is not being accessed and traded upon. The Division's proposed regulations, while not altering investment advisers' existing duty not to trade on insider information, seek to provide investment advisers with greater clarity as to what is impermissible conduct when paying consultants for information.

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Proposed Regulation

Investment Advisers Using Matching or Expert Network Services – Dishonest or Unethical Conduct in the Securities Business

Add the following new subsection (16) to 950 CMR 12.205(9)(c) (non-exclusive list of practices by an investment adviser which shall be deemed “dishonest or unethical conduct or practices in the securities business”):

16. a. To retain consulting services, for compensation that is provided either directly to the consultant or indirectly through a Matching or Expert Network Service, unless the adviser obtains a written certification, signed by the consultant that:

(i) describes all confidentiality restrictions that the consultant has, or reasonably expects to have, regarding Confidential Information; and
(ii) affirmatively states that the consultant will not provide any Confidential Information to the adviser.

b. Notwithstanding section (a) an investment adviser who comes into possession of material Confidential Information through a consultation is precluded from trading any relevant security until such time as the Confidential Information is made public.

c. Definitions. For purposes of this section:

(i) “Confidential Information” means any non-public information, which one is bound by a confidentiality agreement or fiduciary (or similar) duty not to disclose.
(ii) “Matching or Expert Network Service” means a firm that for compensation matches consultants with investment advisers.

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP is a boutique hedge fund law firm.  In addition to investment adviser registration and compliance, we provide expert network compliance consulting services to SEC and state registered hedge fund managers.  Bart Mallon can be reached directly at 415-868-5345.

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Compliance Update for California Hedge Funds – Presentation

As part of the Hedge Fund Networking Summit Webcast Series, Bart Mallon of Mallon P.C. led an hour long presentation on compliance matters for California based hedge fund managers.  The presentation covered the following topics:

  • New SEC and CA Hedge Fund Registration Requirements
  • Registration Overview & Major Issues
  • Compliance Overview
  • Discussion of Other Current Regulatory Issues

There were of number of questions asked by the audience regarding many of the new compliance requirements for registered managers.  We have had good experience with the following groups:

If you attended the event and have follow up generic propecia online pharmacy questions, please feel free to contact us and we will try to get back to you as soon as possible.  The full powerpoint can be downloaded here: CAHF Powerpoint (April 2011) Final

Many thanks to Ron Niemaszyk of Patke & Associates for moderating the event.

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Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP provides investment adviser registration & compliance services to hedge fund managers.  For more information, please call Bart Mallon at 415-868-5345.

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